Book Review: The Gospel of Loki by Joanne M. Harris

The Gospel of Loki - Joanne Harris

Today I’m reviewing this book based on the Nordic mythical Gods by Joanne Harris. Well known for her young adult fantasy series Runemark’s and of course the well-known novel Chocolat.

Title: The Gospel of Loki
Series: N/A
Author: Joanne Harris
Genre: Fantasy / Mythology / Historical Fiction
Publisher: Gollancz
Publication Date: 6 November 2014
Format: eBook / Hardback / Paperback / Audio
Pages: 320
Buy: Amazon UK Amazon US Waterstones Nook UK
Add: Goodreads

Book Blurb:
With his notorious reputation for trickery and deception, and an ability to cause as many problems as he solves, Loki is a Norse god like no other. Demon-born, he is viewed with deepest suspicion by his fellow gods who will never accept him as one of their own and for this he vows to take his revenge.

But while Loki is planning the downfall of Asgard and the humiliation of his tormentors, greater powers are conspiring against the gods and a battle is brewing that will change the fate of the Worlds.

From his recruitment by Odin from the realm of Chaos, through his years as the go-to man of Asgard, to his fall from grace in the build-up to Ragnarok, this is the unofficial history of the world’s ultimate trickster.

My Rating: 4 of 5 Stars

My Review:
My love of history is something like my love of books, it’s stuck in the fantasy realm. I love ancient history and especially that ancient history that leaks into mythology! I’ve read a little about Norse mythology but I will admit to having concentrated my mythological readings on the Greeks.

The Norse Gods have been largely a plaything of comic book writers, especially those fellows at Marvel. There are countless comics and graphic novels about various Norse Gods and I’ve read my fair share of those over the years.

With this novel Joanne Harris has taken the various stories about Loki (because there are many) and has woven a web of intrigue around how he became so infamous for being a trickster, a scoundrel, and why the Norse Gods disliked him SO much.

Told from Loki’s point of view the novel is split into four books or significant events, where he tells the story of events that happened from his emergence from Chaos to the time of Ragnarok. Loki explains how he planned and executed each of them and what the fallout was.

The things we learn from this book is everything in the world is constantly changing, you may have won this round but probably not the war, Gods aren’t infallible, and never, ever trust anybody.

This novel is refreshing, funny, sad, and takes probably one of the most tragic characters from Norse mythology and makes him your hero for this book, well, at least some of it!

I thoroughly enjoyed The Gospel of Loki, I’m really hoping there are more like this to come!

A huge thanks to Gollancz for the ARC of The Gospel of Loki via NetGalley to write this review.

About Joanne Harris:
Joanne Harris is an Anglo-French author, whose books include fourteen novels, two cookbooks and many short stories. Her work is extremely diverse, covering aspects of magic realism, suspense, historical fiction, mythology and fantasy. She has also written a DR WHO novella for the BBC, has scripted guest episodes for the game ZOMBIES, RUN!, and is currently engaged in a number of musical theatre projects as well as developing an original drama for television.

In 2000, her 1999 novel CHOCOLAT was adapted to the screen, starring Juliette Binoche and Johnny Depp. She is an honorary Fellow of St Catharine’s College, Cambridge, and in 2013 was awarded an MBE by the Queen.

Her hobbies are listed in Who’s Who as ‘mooching, lounging, strutting, strumming, priest-baiting and quiet subversion’. She also spends too much time on Twitter; plays flute and bass guitar in a band first formed when she was 16; and works from a shed in her garden at her home in Yorkshire.

Joanne Harris Links:

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